Microsoft has released the Lync 2013 Cumulative Update 1 (CU1).  The naming conventions within “Lync” can be a little confusing.  This is a CLIENT update for Lync 2013.

To enable these Lync 2013 updates, make sure both the Lyncloc and Msores packages are installed.  The MS release notes say that this requires a restart of Lync 2013 after you install the update, but I believe a reboot of the client system is required.

For more information: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2812461

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Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 was released a few months ago, but not many people could do much with it, since it didn’t support co-existence with previous versions.  Finally, Exchange 2007 SP3 Rollup Update 10 and Exchange 2010 SP3 have been released to support coexistence.  These are important rollup and service pack updates, as they enable coexistence with Exchange 2013.

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In Office 365, the default password policy requires users to change their password every 90 days.  To some users this is a ridiculously short period of time, but to some administrators this is too long.  You can work it out between your users and your security team what the right time period is for password expiry, but here are some ways of changing this in Office 365. Read More →

The Exchange 2007/2010 Offline Address Book (OAB) can be a pain to manage in environments where users expect instant access to updates to the Global Address List. Outlook 2007/2010 clients running in Cached Mode use the Offline Address Book by default for all address lookups. This means when a new user is added to your domain and mailbox enabled they will not appear in the "GAL" for Outlook clients until the OAB generation and distribution process has run it’s course. The following article explains how the OABGen and Web-Distribution process works in Exchange 2007 and 2010.

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Most of the projects I work include certificates in some form or fashion.  Often the Certificate Authority is something that someone set up once for a specific purpose and forgot about it.  When I ask, they can’t tell me which server is their CA.  There are a couple of ways to locate the Certificate Authority(ies) in your Active Directory environment.

  • Check the members of the Cert Publishers group in AD.  This is a built in group in Active Directory.
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  • Use the certutil utility from a cmd prompt to determine the CA name and the server hosting the service.  This utility is available on newer Windows OSes (I’ve only tried on Windows 2008 R2).  This command is particularly useful because it tells you the CA name as well as the server hosting it.  The Cert Publishers group will only tell you the server hosting the service.  (Thanks to Greig in Sydney for this find.)

    certutil –config – -ping

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This past week at the Microsoft Exchange Conference 2012 in Orlando, Microsoft Exchange Product Team, MVPs, MCMs, and community members gathered to discuss the impending release of Exchange 2013.  I say “discuss” because that’s how the conference was structured.  This wasn’t your typical death-by-PowerPoint with a few demos in between.  These were fully interactive sessions.  The first day laid the foundation for the conference by giving us an overview of the new Exchange 2013 and it’s cloud version.  The following days were really deep-dive discussions with product team members, and other experts with early knowledge of the product, on topics generated by the attendees.  Here is what I gathered from those sessions.

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